Speakers & Schedule

Keynote Speakers

Dr. Suniya S. Luthar

Dr. Suniya S. Luthar

Founding Director of Authentic Connections

“Youth in High Achieving Schools: Maximizing Resilience”

 

This presentation will focus on the culture-specific risk and protective factors that impact student well-being in high achieving schools. This presentation will also encompass burnout faced by parents, educators, and health workers that support these students.

 

About the Speaker

Founding Director of Authentic Connections, Dr. Suniya S. Luthar is Foundation Professor of Psychology at Arizona State University and Professor Emerita at Columbia University’s Teachers College. Luthar’s research involves vulnerability and resilience among various populations including youth in poverty, children in families affected by mental illness, and teens in upper-middle class families. Her recent research has been focused on motherhood, exploring factors that best help mothers negotiate the challenges of motherhood. Luthar is the mother of two adult children. She lives in Tempe, AZ. Learn More. 

Eve Jardine-Young

Eve Jardine-Young

Principal, Cheltenham Ladies’ College

“Education, the things we have in common”

 

One of the unique features of the WLSA community of member schools is a shared sense of passion, optimism and commitment to a generation of young people who will lead the many cultural, artistic, ethical, scientific and technological advancements in the years to come. 

 

We know the world is complex, and changing rapidly. We also know the world is beleaguered by difficult challenges, and by rising inequalities both within and between nation states.  

 

The young people within our schools are growing up in a world full of choice and possibility, and the choices they make around leadership, economic agency, social inclusion and identity will shape future developments and the society in which they, in time, will raise their own families. 

 

We welcome the chance at our Conference to deepen awareness and understanding of the global diversity within our membership, exploring to what degree we currently share a vision for educational outcomes, and to what extent we are shaped by more local forces, learning from each other within an open, inspiring and collaborate context of fellowship. 

 

About the Speaker

Eve Jardine-Young is the Principal of Cheltenham Ladies’ College in the United Kingdom and serves as Chair of the WLSA Executive Board. Learn more.

Dr. Wong How Man

Dr. Wong How Man

Founder/President, China Exploration & Research Society

“Exploration as Education”

 

Today’s internet age puts online most knowledge, an immense amount of information and data, at a person’s fingertip.

 

However, such knowledge is generally second or third hand, if not further down the historic chain, accumulated over centuries and millenniums. Thus, young adults these days are generally deprived of the joy of primary first-hand discovery.

 

Exploration, on the other hand, emphasizes first-hand information, direct experience, and discovery of new knowledge, be it of our physical world, or even into space and beyond the galaxy.  The speaker will draw on first hand and personal stories from over four decades of exploration, including six expeditions for the National Geographic, to explain how education can be acquired, and enhanced, through exploration.

 

The illustrated lecture would share with the audience from the use of the Space Shuttle to look for lost cities in the Old Silk Road, to defining river sources of six great rivers of Asia, to the depths of caves, to distant islands in the ocean, success and failure, and how students over the years were able to get inspired through such experience.

 

About the Speaker

Dr. Wong How Man Founder and President of the Hong Kong- based China Exploration & Research Society, a pre-eminent non-profit organization specializing in exploration, research, conservation and education in remote China and neighboring countries. Learn more.

 

Session Presenters

Click on the speaker's pictures to learn more about each session.

Lycée Français de New York

Gail Berson

 

Session: How to approach the college admissions process in a developmental way– meeting students where they are

Each student comes to school as an individual with different needs and at different stages of growth. High school educators see tremendous growth and try to plan programming that is appropriate for a wide range of students, and it is through the relationships our students form with educators in our communities that they grow and develop into their best person. In this session we hope to provide information that will be helpful to everyone on making this process less stressful and more of a journey of discovery- to help young people learn about who they are and what they need in their next educational chapter.This session will focus on programs, policies and philosophies that promote a healthy college admission process culture. The high school counselors will share programs that work well in their school environment and our college admissions officer will share his perspective on the evidence he sees in applications of the impact of high school educators.


Session: The Ethics of Counseling and Admissions: Case Studies

Ethical college counseling and admission is the cornerstone of our profession.  In fact, the Code of Ethics and Professional Practices ensures that high professional standards are used in the recruitment of students and the transition into and within postsecondary education.  This interactive session will consider a series of ethical case studies and discuss outcomes and best practices from the perspective of secondary school leaders and admissions leaders and evaluate impacts.

:Director of College Counseling

:Lycée Français de New York (USA)

Appleby College

Theresa Blake

 

Session: Healthy Campuses

Introduction to the conference theme “Healthy Campuses”.

_______________________________________________________________________________

 

Session: Releasing the potential of your faculty; Why? What? How?

This session will explore some of the innovative and forward-looking practices currently employed by schools across the world to empower and develop their faculty staff.

Starting from the premise that teachers and middle leaders are the engine and powerhouse of a school, the panelists will discuss their own experiences of successful programs and initiatives that have supported and driven forward the development of school faculty, and they will share perspectives and insights that will hopefully inspire other colleagues to lead change in their own schools.

:Director, Social and Emotional Learning

:Appleby College (Canada)

Montessori Schools

Berry Bock

 

Session: Releasing the potential of your faculty; Why? What? How?

This session will explore some of the innovative and forward-looking practices currently employed by schools across the world to empower and develop their faculty staff.

Starting from the premise that teachers and middle leaders are the engine and powerhouse of a school, the panelists will discuss their own experiences of successful programs and initiatives that have supported and driven forward the development of school faculty, and they will share perspectives and insights that will hopefully inspire other colleagues to lead change in their own schools.

:Director of Operations

:Montessori Schools (NL)

African Leadership Academy

Chris Bradford

 

Session: Talking Heads – Lessons on Leadership

In this session seven different heads of WLSA schools around the world will share a short lesson they feel will benefit the room – sharing insights as to what leadership can sometimes require, and sometimes look like  given it can – by necessity – be a “lonely” place.

:Founder and Chief Operating Officer

:African Leadership Academy (South Africa)

Colgate University

Tara Bubble

 

Session: Who Are Our Students? Now and Into the Future

As  secondary and higher education’s student demographic evolves, it’s critical that a cultural shift take place on campus —elite institutions especially—centered around empathy and understanding for challenges and obstacles that stand in the way of student persistence and success. This panel will look at the next 10 years and discuss ways institutions can support the new learner.

:Dean of Admission

:Colgate University (USA)

University of Rochester

Jonathan Burdick

 

Session: The importance of successful integration of migrant and refugee students on your campus

This panel addresses the practical challenges – and benefits – of integrating the growing numbers of refugee, migrant and undocumented students into secondary and higher education communities. Together we will explore how effectively incorporating these students is essential to their long-term success and career prospects, fosters truly global learning environments and creates exceptional value for institutions and societies.

:Vice Provost for Enrollment

:University of Rochester (USA)

Escola Sesc de Ensino Medio

Paulo Ceotto

 

Session: Practical solutions to increase the health and happiness of your school community

A recent global study by the OECD shows well-being among youth is at an all-time low. In a volatile and uncertain, complex world that we live in it is more important than ever for educators to promote happiness, well-being, and health.  In this session educators will share ways in which small improvements in their school have positively impacted the lives of their faculty and students.  The  main aspects will be dealt with are the body, the emotions and the mind.

:Assistant to the Head of School

:Escola Sesc de Ensino Medio (BRA)

Harvard Westlake

Jamie Chan

 

Session: Reimagining the Model for Student Support and College Counseling: The Case for a Dean Model

Harvard-Westlake and Poly Prep Country Day School have designed student support models that combine academic advising, personal counseling, and college counseling all within the role of Upper School Dean. Building strong relationships with students and families is the central focus of the dean model. At every step of a student’s experience throughout high school, the dean’s role is to provide mentorship, advice, and individualized support as students navigate their way through the complexities of everything from signing up for courses, dealing with a personally challenging event at home, or navigating the college admissions process. Learn why the Harvard-Westlake School and Poly Prep Country Day School believe wholeheartedly in this model and how, by eliminating traditional silos that often exist between offices and people independent schools, deans are positioned to best serve the needs of students, families, and our school communities.

:Upper School Dean

:Harvard Westlake (USA)

Vanderbilt University

Douglas L. Christiansen, Ph.D

 

Session: The Stress of College Admissions: A Discussion between Schools and Deans

The admissions process to selective colleges is complex, filled with uncertainty, and extraordinarily stressful for high school students to navigate. As a result of the ups and downs of this process and the inherent competition, students often experience a loss of self-confidence and self-esteem.  This session will be an honest and open discussion between school leaders, college counselors, and deans about how students can be best supported during this process, and what can be done to make the admissions process more inclusive of soft skills, such as vulnerability, risk-taking and embracing failure.

:Vice Provost for University Enrollment Affairs & Dean of Admissions and Financial Aid

:Vanderbilt University (USA)

Studyworks & Eton College

Michèle Collias

 

Session: The Ethics of Counselling and Admissions

Michèle Collias, Director of International Programs for the Studyworks, received her B.A. Hons from Wellesley College in 1976, her Juris Doctor (cum laude, Law Review) from Suffolk University in 1981.  Thereafter, she passed the bar exams in Massachusetts, New York and Washington, D.C.  Immediately upon graduation from law school, she started teaching test preparation courses for the Law School Admission Test (LSAT) while simultaneously serving in the US Court of Claims, as a law clerk to a Federal trial judge.  In 1984, she moved to London to start test preparation courses for US entrance exams: SAT, ACT, GMAT, GRE, and LSAT.  She redesigned the company’s preparation programmes to match the needs of UK-educated students.  In addition to advising students on the entire US admissions process she offers test preparation courses in central London and on various US and UK high school campus in the greater London area.  She is currently the US Universities Adviser at Eton College.

:Director of International Programs for Studyworks

:US Universities Adviser at Eton College

Europe at Minerva Schools at KGI

Lucian Cosinschi

 

Session: Redefining education in the 21st century

In addition to local, national and regional forces shaping curriculums, the 21st century looks certain to see at least one major paradigm shift in relation to how education is received, as well as by whom and at what ages(s) during a lifetime.

 

We witnessing the growth of international movements such as University of the Third Age in retirement, a rise in home and supported schooling (including the School of the Air in Australia), and the launch of new models for higher education such as the Minerva Schools at KGI, USA which have no fixed campus base.

 

As new providers are entering the market with innovative technology-enabled models, more traditional models of education will be tested against the needs of future-looking skills requirements, and this panel affords the opportunity to share insights, perspectives and motivations for how education might (or might not) need to be re-imagined and re-defined in the years to come, to remain relevant and powerful for our emerging needs.

:Regional Director

:Europe at Minerva Schools at KGI (Germany)

Potential Project

Gillian Coutts

 

Mindful Leadership for High Performance: beyond the hype

The growing interest in mindfulness in schools typically focuses delivery of programs to students. But what is its potential for school leadership? Join us as we grapple with the messy reality – where we are under pressure, overloaded with information and constantly juggling distractions, whilst the urgent and the important fight for our attention.

 

In this session we will share our journey at Queenwood School as mindfulness has profoundly shaped our senior leaders, both as individuals and as a team, and brought calm and clarity to the working week. There has been a strategic focus on building skills, presence and awareness, self-care and a sense of perspective that over time is having a transformative impact on wellbeing across the school.

:Australian Country Director

:Potential Project (AUS)

Drexel University

Jeannie D’Agostino

 

Session: Sharing Their Stories: Discussing Difficult Situations in an Application

In preparing their university applications, students may be unsure of how and when to share information about challenging situations they have faced. In this session, we aim to explore the ways in which students can be their best self-advocates, in relaying difficult and complex situations to the Admissions Committee, through different application methods (Common Application, university-specific, and UCAS). The expert panel will highlight ways in which college counselors and school officials can best support their students through a USA and UK lens.

 

We will provide an overview on the regulations and protections through the lens of US and UK systems, as well as the support services offered on our campus communities. The conversation will be a comprehensive and focused on supporting students through the application process, as well as providing tools to influencers and stakeholders on how to help students identify the right fit community for their needs.

:Director of International Admissions

:Drexel University (USA)

Groton School

Nishad Das

 

Session: Bridging Cultures

Nishad Das is the Director of Global Education at Groton School. He grew up in India and was educated at the Doon School, St. Stephen’s College Delhi, and Emmanuel College Cambridge, England. He started his teaching career in 1990 in a suburban London school called Caterham, moved to Cheltenham College in 1993, and then to Groton School in 1991. Nishad was the Head of the Mathematics department at Groton, and currently, besides spearheading the school’s global initiatives, is the Co-Chair of the Evaluation and Professional Development committee, teaches mathematics and coaches squash. Nishad is a board member of the GEBG, Global Education Benchmark Group, the largest group of independent school educators in the US that researches and establishes best practices in the field of global education.

:Director of Global Education at Groton School (USA)

People Combine Educational Initiatives Ltd.

Shomie Das

 

Session: A Conversation with Shomie Das

Shomie Das has been a pillar of education since he began his career in 1958 at Gordonstoun School in Scotland, since that time he has been an educator, head of school and has founded many of India’s premiere institutions.  An avid physicist he is a published author, has climbed the Black Peak in the Himalayas and has built the only amateur radio telescope in India. He is a man who has donned many hats as an illustrious educationist. Describing Mr. Das in limited words becomes challenging as he is the person behind the curtain who contributed his vision in education to nearly 76 schools. Giving educational consultancy, contributing to education foundations and several countries around the world Mr. Das has been counselling various school managements on ways and means on how to upgrade institutional infrastructure. In this session Shomie will share his insights on the current state of education and his hopes for where the future will take us.

:Chairman (Non-executive)

:People Combine Educational Initiatives Ltd. (India)

Montessori Schools Amsterdam

Rogier Dijk

Session: Releasing the Potential of Your Faculty: Why? What? How?

 

Rogier Dijk has a master degree in Education and has worked with adolescents from all backgrounds for more than 20 years. He is a teacher, Montessori Coordinator and trainer at the Metis Montessori in Amsterdam. Rogier is a member of the development team for the future Montessori International school in Amsterdam

 

As a trainer and coach he works with adults. Rogier also gives lectures and inspirational speeches. Designing Montessori based curricula and inspiring educators into becoming the best version of themselves is a strong drive in his work.

 

“Getting the best out of your pupils starts by getting the best out of your staff.”

 

 

Imperial College London

Catherine Eames

 

Session: Supporting Students through Times of Change

This panel will examine the ways secondary schools and universities can support students in transition.  Whether it be the period between lower school to upper school, upper school to higher education, or higher education to the workforce, institutions are charged with helping students become well-adjusted citizens and school personnel have an important role in assisting students’ adaptation to change.  Panelists will share insights, programs and perspectives that aid in student transitions on their campus and beyond.

:International Student Recruitment Manager

:Imperial College London

Inventure Academy

Nooraine Fazal

 

Practical solutions to increase the health and happiness of your school community

A recent global study by the OECD shows well-being among youth is at an all-time low. In a volatile and uncertain, complex world that we live in it is more important than ever for educators to promote happiness, well-being, and health.  In this session educators will share ways in which small improvements in their school have positively impacted the lives of their faculty and students.  The  main aspects will be dealt with are the body, the emotions and the mind.

:Managing Trustee, CEO & Co-Founder

:Inventure Academy

Cornell University

Shawn Felton

 

Session: Bridging Cultures

How should educators help bridge the gap to a new vision of globalism? Globalization has faltered, some would say, failed, with growing inequalities, divisions and challenges.  How can schools and universities, rooted in their local communities and working across educational sectors,  better cultivate an appreciation of the connections that bind communities around the world?

:Director of Undergraduate Admissions

:Cornell University (USA)

Boarding Schools’ Association

Robin Fletcher

 

Session: The importance of successful integration of migrant and refugee students on your campus

This panel addresses the practical challenges – and benefits – of integrating the growing numbers of refugee, migrant and undocumented students into secondary and higher education communities. Together we will explore how effectively incorporating these students is essential to their long-term success and career prospects, fosters truly global learning environments and creates exceptional value for institutions and societies.

:Chief Executive

:Boarding Schools’ Association (UK)

Flow In Action

Elaine France

 

Session: Practical solutions to increase the health and happiness of your school community

A recent global study by the OECD shows well-being among youth is at an all-time low. In a volatile and uncertain, complex world that we live in it is more important than ever for educators to promote happiness, well-being, and health.  In this session educators will share ways in which small improvements in their school have positively impacted the lives of their faculty and students.  The  main aspects will be dealt with are the body, the emotions and the mind.

:Founder

:Flow In Action

The Brearley School

Jane Fried

 

Session: The Creation and Implementation of a K-XII Student Life Program to Complement a Rigorous Academic Program

Schools like ours are well regarded for their academic excellence. We attract bright students who go onto world class colleges and universities, and contribute to society in meaningful ways. However, a student – a child, is far more than the sum of their academic  efforts.  With anxiety and depression reaching unprecedented levels evident at the higher education level and ever-creeping into younger grades, it is imperative that schools support the learning of their students beyond the three R’s. We must care for them socially, emotionally, and in terms of their mental and physical health.

 

Brearley has developed a three-strand program in the areas of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion; Social-Emotional Learning; and Sexuality and Health Education for all students in our K-XII girls’ school. Hear from our Head of School and Assistant Head of School for Student Life talk about Brearley’s K-XII Student Life program and the structures in place which support it. Speakers will focus, in particular, on the opportunities and challenges of implementing the K-XII  sexuality  health  education program.

:Head of School

:The Brearley School (USA)

Vanderbilt University

John O. Gaines

 

Session: The Ethics of Counseling and Admissions: Case Studies

Ethical college counseling and admission is the cornerstone of our profession.  In fact, the Code of Ethics and Professional Practices ensures that high professional standards are used in the recruitment of students and the transition into and within postsecondary education.  This interactive session will consider a series of ethical case studies and discuss outcomes and best practices from the perspective of secondary school leaders and admissions leaders and evaluate impacts.

 

:Director of Undergraduate Admissions

:Vanderbilt University (USA)

Goodyear Capital Corporation & Goodyear Investment Company

Charles Goodyear

 

Session: Closing the Emotional Preparation Gap

Social and emotional abilities are said to be indicators of how well a person adjusts to their environment, change and, ultimately, how they experience achievement over the course of their life. Core development abilities such as mindfulness, emotional stability, openness and affability, can be as or even more important than cognitive intelligence in determining future employment. Despite these competencies being related to meaningful life outcomes, it can be challenging for educators to find effective ways to prioritize, teach and assess social and emotional skills.

 

Combining social and emotional skills with academic development creates high-quality learning experiences that empower students to be more effective contributors in their classrooms today and in their workplaces and communities tomorrow. This panel made up of educators, university deans and business leaders will share their personal experiences on the social and emotional abilities needed to transition from school to the workforce.

 

 

 

:President

:Goodyear Capital Corporation & Goodyear Investment Company (USA)

Poly Prep Country Day School

Kyle Graham

 

Session: Reimagining the Model for Student Support and College Counseling: The Case for a Dean Model

Harvard-Westlake and Poly Prep Country Day School have designed student support models that combine academic advising, personal counseling, and college counseling all within the role of Upper School Dean. Building strong relationships with students and families is the central focus of the dean model. At every step of a student’s experience throughout high school, the dean’s role is to provide mentorship, advice, and individualized support as students navigate their way through the complexities of everything from signing up for courses, dealing with a personally challenging event at home, or navigating the college admissions process. Learn why the Harvard-Westlake School and Poly Prep Country Day School believe wholeheartedly in this model and how, by eliminating traditional silos that often exist between offices and people independent schools, deans are positioned to best serve the needs of students, families, and our school communities.

:Assistant Head of School for Enrollment Management and Student Outcomes

:Poly Prep Country Day School (USA)

Phillips Academy Andover

Carolina Artacho Guerra

 

Session: Best practices in curriculum and pedagogy for gender-inclusive STEM courses and classrooms

STEM classrooms are often perceived as neutral spaces, yet the STEM higher education and professional arenas continue to lack diversity. Can we make our entry points into scientific endeavors more inclusive? This workshop will provide a framework to understand and classify our science practices through the lens of gender inclusion. We will also generate specific tools and skills to use in a STEM classroom to challenge the notion of neutrality and create more inclusive learning environments.

:Instructor

:Phillips Academy Andover (USA)

Westville Boys’ High School

Trevor Hall

 

Session: The Future of Technology on Campus: maximizing the opportunities and minimizing the dangers.

The session description is: Rapid technological innovation is creating immense transformations in the way students navigate online spaces. How do schools balance the enormous benefits of technology with what we are now realizing as the enormous impact on student wellbeing? How do we construct communities that embrace the positive elements of technology and at the same time, recognize and manage the potential downsides?  In this interactive session we will discuss real life scenarios for striking the balance.

:Headmaster

:Westville Boys’ High School (South Africa)

Marlborough College

Niall Hamilton

 

Session: Measuring the Unmeasurable

Introduction to the conference theme “Measuring the Unmeasurable”.

:International Admissions Tutor

:Marlborough College (UK)

Groton School

Megan Harlan

 

Session: Holistic Approach to College Counseling & Admissions

Introduction to the conference theme “Holistic Approach to College Counseling & Admissions”.

 


Session: Living Under the Microscope of Social Media

Facebook, Instagram, Snap Chat, Instant Message, WeChat, Apps, Stories, Pictures, and hashtags- Good Grief! How does technology affect our youth today? This campfire will explore the influences of technology to the brain, to decision making, to mental health, and will also explore how we can harness the constant flow of information to perhaps help our youth as well.

:Director of College Counselling

:Groton School (USA)

Oakham School

David Harrow

 

Session: Future-proofing students through inquiry

Seymour Papert – central to revolutions in child development, AI and computational technologies for education – highlighted that it is impossible to teach students everything that they need to know, so the best we can do is to position them where they can find out what they need to know when they need to know it. This is our increasingly urgent task, and it does not happen by chance.

 

We focus on our efforts to reach this position by design through the development of a Framework Of Skills for Inquiry Learning (FOSIL). As a model of the inquiry process, FOSIL is based on the work of Barbara Stripling, but is further informed by the ground-breaking work of Carol Kuhlthau in describing the affective, cognitive and physical demands of inquiry in order to shape more effective interventions. We conclude with a consideration of the many and varied benefits of FOSIL, especially to students.

:Academic Deputy Head

:Oakham School (UK)

Phillips Academy Andover and Brace Center for Gender Studies

Kay Heffernan

 

Session: “A Framework of Care: a Queer-Inclusive, Sex-Positive, Trauma-Informed Approach to Peer Health Education”

In a 2017 NAIS report, authors Fonte et. al write, “Health education and sexuality education curricula may be interpreted as competing with the ultimate mission of core academic schooling.” What are the perceived and real barriers to establishing comprehensive health education in your school, with your students? Learn the tenets of and resources needed for a sex education curriculum that is queer-inclusive, trauma-informed, and sex-positive. This session also covers the importance of values-driven mentorship in developing these programs. We will implicate ourselves, our attitudes towards sexuality, and our views on adolescence in our discussion, so come ready to share.

:Former Fellow in English and Brace Center for Gender Studies Liaison

:Phillips Academy Andover (USA)

University of Michigan - Ann Arbor

Kedra Ishop

Session: Bridging Cultures

 

Kedra Ishop, PhD, serves as Vice Provost for Enrollment Management at the University of Michigan – Ann Arbor.  She is a nationally recognized expert, speaker and advisor on issues in higher education related to diversity, affordability, assessment, admissions and enrollment.  She has served on various domestic and international boards for the College Board, ACT, Coalition for College Access, NCAA and others.  In overseeing undergraduate admissions, financial aid, new student programs, registrar, marketing and communications, technology and enrollment research, Dr. Ishop leads a dynamic team in Michigan’s enrollment effort and strategic initiatives.  The Office of Enrollment Management orients these centrally-administered units to lead the University of Michigan’s enrollment functions in a student-centered effort across the institution, utilizing data and analysis to shape strategic directions to the benefit of the institution and the students they serve.

 

Prior to her tenure at Michigan, she served for 17 years at the University of Texas at Austin, departing as Vice Provost and Director of Admissions.  Dr. Ishop received her Bachelor’s, Master’s and PhD in Higher Education Administration from UT Austin.

Whittle School & Studios

Charlie Jenkinson

 

Session: Who Are Our Students? Now and in the Future

Charlie has held various leadership roles in three of the UK’s leading boarding schools, including Eton College, and is currently consulting for Whittle School & Studios on their signature Advisory program. Throughout his career, Charlie has worked to integrate the academic and pastoral components of schools, resulting in innovative programs that deepen students’ sense of identity and purpose in local and global spaces. The success of these programs as integrators of learning results from Charlie’s deep understanding of schools as complex systems, an understanding fostered through oversight roles in a variety of organisations, including as Vice-Chair of a multi-academy governing body. He works with schools towards a variety of purposes but specialises in helping schools with international partners develop deep and meaningful programs for students.

:Advisory Consultant at Whittle School & Studios (USA)

New York University

MJ Knoll-Finn

 

Session: Closing the Emotional Preparation Gap

Social and emotional abilities are said to be indicators of how well a person adjusts to their environment, change and, ultimately, how they experience achievement over the course of their life. Core development abilities such as mindfulness, emotional stability, openness and affability, can be as or even more important than cognitive intelligence in determining future employment. Despite these competencies being related to meaningful life outcomes, it can be challenging for educators to find effective ways to prioritize, teach and assess social and emotional skills.

 

Combining social and emotional skills with academic development creates high-quality learning experiences that empower students to be more effective contributors in their classrooms today and in their workplaces and communities tomorrow. This panel made up of educators, university deans and business leaders will share their personal experiences on the social and emotional abilities needed to transition from school to the workforce.

:Senior Vice President for Enrollment Management

:New York University (USA)

Institute of Positive Education, Geelong Grammar School

Dr. Ronald Lalonde

 

Session: 10 Years of Positive Education, 10 Lessons Learned
Geelong Grammar School holds an important place in the history of Positive Education. As a pioneer, however, the school’s journey included missteps and missed opportunities. Join us as we share the story of the development of Positive Education at Geelong Grammar School and explore ten of the most important lessons about successful implementation that we learned along the way.

 

Session: Leading in Complexity
School leaders face pressures to adapt to change, and often that means taking on the weight of finding the right way forward. In this talk, explore what we know about being well as a leader and learn techniques to care for yourself, to keep your intention clear and focused, and to maximize the capacities of those around you. Embed learning about Positive Leadership in your own practices and provide a model of Positive Education to your school community.

:Regional Manager Middle East

:Institute of Positive Education, Geelong Grammar School (Australia)

Oakham School

Nigel Lashbrook

 

Session: Changing Education: The Next 20 Years

There are many factors altering what schools may look like in the next 20 years: unprecedented global forces and the uncharted territories of new technologies and shifts in the ways students want to learn and teachers want to teach. The future of education will require educators to be more pioneering, collaborative and inventive as students will become consumers of education.

 

It’s important to think about what we can do to prepare for the future so we can improve schools today. In this session different leaders at WLSA schools around the world will share an inspirational lesson on the evolution of education at their school and what they wish for the next 20 years.

:Headmaster

:Oakham School (UK)

Cheltenham Ladies’ College

Dr. Hilary Laver

 

Supporting International Students

International students are considered to be a vulnerable group by safeguarding experts.  Whilst we seek to encourage international students to come and study in our countries, we must ensure that they are well looked after, that their welfare is protected, and that their experience of life and study in their new country is therefore extremely positive.

This session will explore how to best support international students, drawing on the experience and expertise of the panelists, and will cover: pre-departure support; the role of the agent and educational guardian; managing expectations of both student and parents/family; culture shock; safeguarding; integration; mental wellbeing; undiagnosed conditions such as autism; cultural stigma; undisclosed medical conditions; and successful learning

 

:Director of Admissions

:Cheltenham Ladies’ College (UK)

Boston College

Robert S. Lay

 

Session: How to approach the college admissions process in a developmental way – meeting students where they are

Each student comes to school as an individual with different needs and at different stages of growth. High school educators see tremendous growth and try to plan programming that is appropriate for a wide range of students, and it is through the relationships our students form with educators in our communities that they grow and develop into their best person. In this session we hope to provide information that will be helpful to everyone on making this process less stressful and more of a journey of discovery- to help young people learn about who they are and what they need in their next educational chapter.This session will focus on programs, policies and philosophies that promote a healthy college admission process culture. The high school counselors will share programs that work well in their school environment and our college admissions officer will share his perspective on the evidence he sees in applications of the impact of high school educators.

:Special Assistant to the Provost and Former Dean for Enrollment Management

:Boston College (USA)

GeneScience Pharmaceutical Inc.

Dr. Jin Lei

Session: Closing the Emotional Preparation Gap

Social and emotional abilities are said to be indicators of how well a person adjusts to their environment, change and, ultimately, how they experience achievement over the course of their life. Core development abilities such as mindfulness, emotional stability, openness and affability, can be as or even more important than cognitive intelligence in determining future employment. Despite these competencies being related to meaningful life outcomes, it can be challenging for educators to find effective ways to prioritize, teach and assess social and emotional skills.

 

Combining social and emotional skills with academic development creates high-quality learning experiences that empower students to be more effective contributors in their classrooms today and in their workplaces and communities tomorrow. This panel made up of educators, university deans and business leaders will share their personal experiences on the social and emotional abilities needed to transition from school to the workforce.

: CEO

:GeneScience Pharmaceutical Inc. (China)

Author

Liu Liu

 

Session: Equal opportunity and the ultimate pursuit of education

In the past 30 years, the wealth of 1% of the wealthy people in the United States has increased by 200 times, while at the same time 75% of ordinary people’s wealth has increased by 45%, which is the trend of the world. As the polarization between the rich and the poor intensifies, people with low income around the world and the new immigrants who lost their lands, it’s transforming into the biggest injustice among them showing an unfair education.

 

In China, privileged children go to private schools with a state-of-the-art equipment and the best teachers while the migrant’s children cannot have the same privileges. The gap between public schools in Shanghai is not so obvious. But the privileged children go abroad to participate in summer camps, winter camps, etc during holidays, providing them a more global perspective, while the migrant workers have no money for tutors after school; not to mention traveling, study tours, etc. With such an education gap it is extremely harmful to society. Fair opportunity is a constant driving force for social progress.

:Author (China)

WLSA Fudan Academy

Tony Little

 

Session: A Conversation with Shomie Das

Tony Little will be interviewing the former head of Gordonstoun School, Shomie Das. The conversation will focus on the progress and future of international education.

_______________________________________________________________________________

 

Session: Closing the Emotional Preparation Gap

Social and emotional abilities are said to be indicators of how well a person adjusts to their environment, change and, ultimately, how they experience achievement over the course of their life. Core development abilities such as mindfulness, emotional stability, openness and affability, can be as or even more important than cognitive intelligence in determining future employment. Despite these competencies being related to meaningful life outcomes, it can be challenging for educators to find effective ways to prioritize, teach and assess social and emotional skills.

 

Combining social and emotional skills with academic development creates high-quality learning experiences that empower students to be more effective contributors in their classrooms today and in their workplaces and communities tomorrow. This panel made up of educators, university deans and business leaders will share their personal experiences on the social and emotional abilities needed to transition from school to the workforce.

:President

:WLSA Fudan Academy (China)

Montgomery Bell Academy

Virginia Maddux

:Director of College Counseling

:Montgomery Bell Academy (USA)

Norfolk Academy

Dennis G. Manning

 

Session: The Stress of College Admissions: A Discussion between Schools and Deans

The admissions process to selective colleges is complex, filled with uncertainty, and extraordinarily stressful for high school students to navigate. As a result of the ups and downs of this process and the inherent competition, students often experience a loss of self-confidence and self-esteem.  This session will be an honest and open discussion between school leaders, college counselors, and deans about how students can be best supported during this process, and what can be done to make the admissions process more inclusive of soft skills, such as vulnerability, risk-taking and embracing failure.

:Headmaster

:Norfolk Academy (USA)

Groton School

Temba Maqubela

 

Session: Talking Heads – Lessons on Leadership

In this session seven different heads of WLSA schools around the world will share a short lesson they feel will benefit the room – sharing insights as to what leadership can sometimes require, and sometimes look like  given it can – by necessity – be a “lonely” place.

:Headmaster

:Groton School (USA)

The Webb Schools

Hector Martinez

 

Session: How to best utilize your school community to serve the needs of all of your students in their journey to college

It takes a village to get a young person to college and independent schools have a unique opportunity to leverage the strengths and talents of the adults in the community to support student growth. This session will focus on how various schools utilize the strengths and talents of their community to develop and support a healthy college search process for students. Our panelists will share information about specific programs or procedures that help students feel comfortable focusing on fit for them, not where the school falls in the rankings. They will provide information about how they educate faculty about the college admissions process and will discuss programs that involve teachers or other community members (for example, programs about arts in admission or collegiate athletics). It is our hope that the pragmatic, programmatic information presented will provide those in attendance with information that they can adapt for use in their schools.

:Dean of College Guidance

:The Webb Schools (USA)

The College Board

James Montoya

 

Session: Redefining education in the 21st century

In addition to local, national and regional forces shaping curriculums, the 21st century looks certain to see at least one major paradigm shift in relation to how education is received, as well as by whom and at what ages(s) during a lifetime.

 

We witnessing the growth of international movements such as University of the Third Age in retirement, a rise in home and supported schooling (including the School of the Air in Australia), and the launch of new models for higher education such as the Minerva Schools at KGI, USA which have no fixed campus base.

 

As new providers are entering the market with innovative technology-enabled models, more traditional models of education will be tested against the needs of future-looking skills requirements, and this panel affords the opportunity to share insights, perspectives and motivations for how education might (or might not) need to be re-imagined and re-defined in the years to come, to remain relevant and powerful for our emerging needs.

:Chief of Membership, Governance, and Global Higher Education & Secretary of the Corporation

:The College Board (USA)

Boston Public Schools & Project Decathlon

Elizabeth M. Morrison

 

 

Session: Managing Parents

Elizabeth M. Morrison. Elizabeth received her Masters Degree at the Harvard Graduate School of Education and her Bachelor of Arts Degree from Curry College in Milton, MA.  She is from the inner city of Boston, Massachusetts, a graduate of Boston Public Schools and a frequent traveler to Africa.  Liz brings a strategic perspective to the education arena in the United States and internationally.  Before creating and launching Project Decathlon, Liz was the Executive Director of two Foundations, a Team Leader, a Lifelong Learning Coach, a Consultant, Grant Writer and Grant Reviewer. Her hands-on experience outside of the traditional classroom included several years with nonprofit afterschool and summer enrichment programs.  Currently she is an Educator within the Boston Public Schools system.

 

Her efforts have been featured in the Harvard Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics newsletters titled, Outreach to Ghana and African Solar Eclipse. The American Camp Association Camping Magazine also featured her efforts in Africa in the article titled Change Makers in Africa.  Her belief in the power of young people has earned her the title of incredible influencer. Connecting the unconnected to endless opportunities remains at the forefront of her work.

 

She is member of American Camping Association, International Camping Fellowship, Harvard Club of Boston and the Harvard Alumni for Global Women’s Empowerment.

:Educator at Boston Public Schools

:Founder of Project Decathalon

Marlborough College

Bill Nicholas

 

Session: Who Are Our Students? Now and Into the Future

As  secondary and higher education’s student demographic evolves, it’s critical that a cultural shift take place on campus —elite institutions especially—centered around empathy and understanding for challenges and obstacles that stand in the way of student persistence and success. This panel will look at the next 10 years and discuss ways institutions can support the new learner.

:Second Master

:Marlborough College (UK)

Appleby College

Innes van Nostrand

 

Session: Supporting International Students

In 2012, Innes van Nostrand was appointed the Principal of Appleby College. An engineer by training, he served previously for 25 years at Upper Canada College and Queen’s University, in addition to consulting and/or participating in review teams at a wide variety of universities and schools across Canada. Innes has been involved as a volunteer, presenter, author, and Board member with a variety of professional and community organizations, including Canadian Accredited Independent Schools (CAIS), The Canadian Council for the Advancement of Education (CCAE), Round Square, TABS, CASE, NAIS, G20/30 Schools, WLSA, Christ Church Deer Park, and Queen’s University.

 

:Principal at Appleby College

Sugamo Gakuen

Hidemasa Okada

 

Session: The Future of Technology on Campus: maximizing the opportunities and minimizing the dangers

Rapid technological innovation is creating immense transformations in the way students navigate online spaces. How do schools balance the enormous benefits of technology with what we are now realizing as the enormous impact on student wellbeing?  How do we construct communities that embrace the positive elements of technology and at the same time, recognize and manage the potential downsides?  In this interactive session we will discuss real life scenarios for striking the balance.

:Head of Overseas Education

:Sugamo Gakuen (JPN)

Korea International School

Michelle Quirin

 

Session: Releasing the potential of your faculty; Why? What? How?

This session will explore some of the innovative and forward-looking practices currently employed by schools across the world to empower and develop their faculty staff.

 

Starting from the premise that teachers and middle leaders are the engine and powerhouse of a school, the panelists will discuss their own experiences of successful programmes and initiatives that have supported and driven forward the development of school faculty, and they will share perspectives and insights that will hopefully inspire other colleagues to lead change in their own schools.

 

I have heard from several of your staff, that KIS creates a community that encourages longevity in staff turnover – I think your unique view would be valuable to our delegates and hope you will consider speaking.

:School Director

:Korea International School (South Korea)

University of St Andrews

Julie Ramsay

 

Session: Sharing Their Stories: Discussing Difficult Situations in an Application

In preparing their university applications, students may be unsure of how and when to share information about challenging situations they have faced. In this session, we aim to explore the ways in which students can be their best self-advocates, in relaying difficult and complex situations to the Admissions Committee, through different application methods (Common Application, university-specific, and UCAS). The expert panel will highlight ways in which college counselors and school officials can best support their students through a USA and UK lens.

 

We will provide an overview on the regulations and protections through the lens of US and UK systems, as well as the support services offered on our campus communities. The conversation will be a comprehensive and focused on supporting students through the application process, as well as providing tools to influencers and stakeholders on how to help students identify the right fit community for their needs.

:Director of Admissions

:University of St Andrews (UK)

Mental Health Consultant & Program Developer

Amy Rankin

 

Session: Practical solutions to increase the health and happiness of your school community

A recent global study by the OECD shows well-being among youth is at an all-time low. In a volatile and uncertain, complex world that we live in it is more important than ever for educators to promote happiness, well-being, and health.  In this session educators will share ways in which small improvements in their school have positively impacted the lives of their faculty and students.  The  main aspects will be dealt with are the body, the emotions and the mind.

:Mental Health Consultant & Program Developer

Reddam House Ballito

Catherine Ann Raw

 

Session: Redefining education in the 21st century

In addition to local, national and regional forces shaping curriculums, the 21st century looks certain to see at least one major paradigm shift in relation to how education is received, as well as by whom and at what ages(s) during a lifetime.

 

We witnessing the growth of international movements such as University of the Third Age in retirement, a rise in home and supported schooling (including the School of the Air in Australia), and the launch of new models for higher education such as the Minerva Schools at KGI, USA which have no fixed campus base.

 

As new providers are entering the market with innovative technology-enabled models, more traditional models of education will be tested against the needs of future-looking skills requirements, and this panel affords the opportunity to share insights, perspectives and motivations for how education might (or might not) need to be re-imagined and re-defined in the years to come, to remain relevant and powerful for our emerging needs.

:Principal

:Reddam House Ballito (South Africa)

Rice University

Yvonne Romero da Silva

 

Session: The Stress of College Admissions: A Discussion Between Schools and Deans

 

Yvonne M. Romero da Silva, Vice President for Enrollment, was appointed in 2017. The enrollment division manages the admissions, enrollment, and financial aid services for all undergraduate students at Rice University. Prior to joining Rice, Dr. Romero da Silva served as the Vice Dean and Director of Admissions at the University of Pennsylvania. From 2005 to 2012, she worked at the College Board as a corporate strategist and specialist in higher education enrollment services. From 1994 to 2002 she led minority recruitment initiatives at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Romero da Silva has gained national attention for her successful strategic enrollment planning efforts and for the development of a new holistic evaluation process at UPenn. She earned her bachelor’s degree in mathematics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, a master’s degree in education from the Harvard Graduate School of Education, and a master’s degree in business administration from the Stanford Graduate School of Business. In 2017, Romero da Silva earned her doctorate degree in higher education administration from the University of Pennsylvania Graduate School of Education.

:Vice President for Enrollment at Rice University

Welham Girls’ School

Padmini Sambasivam

 

Session: Changing Education: The Next 20 Years

There are many factors altering what schools may look like in the next 20 years: unprecedented global forces and the uncharted territories of new technologies and shifts in the ways students want to learn and teachers want to teach. The future of education will require educators to be more pioneering, collaborative and inventive as students will become consumers of education.

 

It’s important to think about what we can do to prepare for the future so we can improve schools today. In this session different leaders at WLSA schools around the world will share an inspirational lesson on the evolution of education at their school and what they wish for the next 20 years.

:Principal

:Welham Girls’ School (India)

LEAF Academy

Matej Sapak

 

Session: Talking Heads – Lessons on Leadership

In this session seven different heads of WLSA schools around the world will share a short lesson they feel will benefit the room – sharing insights as to what leadership can sometimes require, and sometimes look like  given it can – by necessity – be a “lonely” place.

:Principal

:LEAF Academy (Slovakia)

Cranbrook School

Nicholas Sampson

 

Session: Changing Education: The Next 20 Years

There are many factors altering what schools may look like in the next 20 years: unprecedented global forces and the uncharted territories of new technologies and shifts in the ways students want to learn and teachers want to teach. The future of education will require educators to be more pioneering, collaborative and inventive as students will become consumers of education.

 

It’s important to think about what we can do to prepare for the future so we can improve schools today. In this session different leaders at WLSA schools around the world will share an inspirational lesson on the evolution of education at their school and what they wish for the next 20 years.

:Headmaster

:Cranbrook School (AUS)

The Emerald Heights International School

Siddharth Singh

 

Session: Closing the Emotional Preparation Gap

Social and emotional abilities are said to be indicators of how well a person adjusts to their environment, change and, ultimately, how they experience achievement over the course of their life. Core development abilities such as mindfulness, emotional stability, openness and affability, can be as or even more important than cognitive intelligence in determining future employment. Despite these competencies being related to meaningful life outcomes, it can be challenging for educators to find effective ways to prioritize, teach and assess social and emotional skills.

:Director

:The Emerald Heights International School (India)

Education Salad

Dr. Sumer Singh

 

Session: Empowering Students

Introduction to the conference theme “Empowering Students”.

:Education Consulant

:Education Salad (India)

Phillips Academy Andover

Emma Staffaroni

 

Session: Creating Inclusive Spaces for Trans*, Non-Binary, and Gender Non-Conforming Students

How familiar are you with the gender unicorn? In this session, educators at all different levels of knowledge and experience can come together to think about how to make their schools, classrooms, playing fields, dormitories, hallways, and community centers more inclusive, caring, and supportive spaces for students with diverse gender identities and expressions. We all have students who are not cisgender at our schools, whether we know it or not. Are we ready for them? Are we going to be able to support them with resources, spaces, and an informed community? Emma Staffaroni from Phillips Academy Andover has worked with a team of colleagues at their New England boarding school to found an all-gender dormitory. The idea started with a student, and after careful thinking, flexibility, and student-driven policy change, Andover opened its all-gender dorm in the fall of 2017. Emma will talk through some conceptual and logistical ways to tailor gender inclusivity policies and practices to your specific institution. There will be time for brainstorming and reflecting on your own school’s most immediate areas for growth in gender inclusion.

:Instructor

:Phillips Academy Andover (USA)

Groton School

Rebecca Stanton

 

Session: Supporting Students through Transitions

After studying business and law in France and the United States I became a teacher at Groton School and assumed other duties as dorm head, department head, advisor, coach. I just completed my 26th year at Groton School. I am also the founder of Rebecca Stanton Education Consulting LLC, since 2013, working with international families on education and cultural appreciation.

:Head of World Language Department

:International Community Advisor

:Groton School (USA)

:Founder of Rebecca Stanton Education Consulting

Episcopal High School

Charles M. Stillwell

 

Session: The Future of Technology on Campus: maximizing the opportunities and minimizing the dangers

Rapid technological innovation is creating immense transformations in the way students navigate online spaces. How do schools balance the enormous benefits of technology with what we are now realizing as the enormous impact on student wellbeing?  How do we construct communities that embrace the positive elements of technology and at the same time, recognize and manage the potential downsides?  In this interactive session we will discuss real life scenarios for striking the balance.

:Head of School

:Episcopal High School (USA)

The Webb Schools

Taylor Stockdale

 

Session: The Future of Technology on Campus: maximizing the opportunities and minimizing the dangers

Rapid technological innovation is creating immense transformations in the way students navigate online spaces. How do schools balance the enormous benefits of technology with what we are now realizing as the enormous impact on student wellbeing?  How do we construct communities that embrace the positive elements of technology and at the same time, recognize and manage the potential downsides?  In this interactive session we will discuss real life scenarios for striking the balance.

 

__________________________________________________________________________________________

 

Session: Who Are Our Students? Now and Into the Future

As  secondary and higher education’s student demographic evolves, it’s critical that a cultural shift take place on campus —elite institutions especially—centered around empathy and understanding for challenges and obstacles that stand in the way of student persistence and success. This panel will look at the next 10 years and discuss ways institutions can support the new learner.

:Head of School

:The Webb Schools (USA)

Queenwood School

Elizabeth Stone

 

Session: Mindful Leadership for High Performance: Beyond the Hype

The growing interest in mindfulness in schools typically focuses delivery of programs to students. But what is its potential for school leadership? Join us as we grapple with the messy reality – where we are under pressure, overloaded with information and constantly juggling distractions, whilst the urgent and the important fight for our attention.

In this session we will share our journey at Queenwood School as mindfulness has profoundly shaped our senior leaders, both as individuals and as a team, and brought calm and clarity to the working week. There has been a strategic focus on building skills, presence and awareness, self-care and a sense of perspective that over time is having a transformative impact on wellbeing across the school.

:Principal

:Queenwood School (AUS)

Dartmouth College

Zholl Tablante

 

Session: How to approach the college admissions process in a developmental way- meeting students where they are.

Each student comes to school as an individual with different needs and at different stages of growth. High school educators see tremendous growth and try to plan programming that is appropriate for a wide range of students, and it is through the relationships our students form with educators in our communities that they grow and develop into their best person. In this session we hope to provide information that will be helpful to everyone on making this process less stressful and more of a journey of discovery- to help young people learn about who they are and what they need in their next educational chapter.This session will focus on programs, policies and philosophies that promote a healthy college admission process culture. The high school counselors will share programs that work well in their school environment and our college admissions officer will share his perspective on the evidence he sees in applications of the impact of high school educators.

:Senior Assistant Director of Admissions

:Dartmouth College (USA)

Maru-a-Pula School

Andy Taylor

 

Session: Who Belongs In Our Schools?

Southern Africa is home to three of the most unequal countries in the world.  According to the UN’s standard measure of inequality, the “Gini coefficient,” which measures the distribution of health, education and income, the world ranking is: 1) South Africa, 2) Namibia, 3) Haiti and 4) Botswana.

 

What can our schools do about this inequality?

 

This session will ask how members of the “World’s Leading Schools Association” can address this growing educational gap between the world’s rich and poor.   We will look at practical steps – scholarships, service projects, awareness raising – that any school can take to foster greater equality in an increasingly unequal world.

:Principal

:Maru-a-Pula School (Botswana)

Oakham School

Darryl Toerin

 

Session: Future-proofing students through inquiry

Seymour Papert – central to revolutions in child development, AI and computational technologies for education – highlighted that it is impossible to teach students everything that they need to know, so the best we can do is to position them where they can find out what they need to know when they need to know it. This is our increasingly urgent task, and it does not happen by chance.

 

We focus on our efforts to reach this position by design through the development of a Framework Of Skills for Inquiry Learning (FOSIL). As a model of the inquiry process, FOSIL is based on the work of Barbara Stripling, but is further informed by the ground-breaking work of Carol Kuhlthau in describing the affective, cognitive and physical demands of inquiry in order to shape more effective interventions. We conclude with a consideration of the many and varied benefits of FOSIL, especially to students.

:Head of Library

:Oakham School (UK)

University of Chicago

Michelle Trimpe

Session: Bridging Cultures

 

Michelle is an Assistant Director of Admissions at the University of Chicago specializing in admission for students from Mainland China. She has worked in the field of international education for five years across the United States, Cambodia, Bulgaria and Mexico. She is passionate about bridging enrollment management with student learning and development and has a Master of Arts in Student Affairs Administration from Michigan State University.

The Lovett School

Frances Turner

 

Session: Living Under the Microscope of Social Media

Facebook, Instagram, Snap Chat, Instant Message, WeChat, Apps, Stories, Pictures, and hashtags- Good Grief! How does technology affect our youth today? This campfire will explore the influences of technology to the brain, to decision making, to mental health, and will also explore how we can harness the constant flow of information to perhaps help our youth as well.

 

:Director of Civic and Global Engagement

:The Lovett School (USA)

Westville Girls' High School

Russell Untiedt

Session: The Next 20 Years

 

Russell has been an educational leader for over 24 years, teaching in diverse schools in South Africa, both State and Private. He is currently teaching at Westville Girls’ High School in KwaZulu-Natal, managing the Arts and heading up both Leadership and Transformation and Diversity. Russell has had extensive experience across with areas of education that can equip 21st century schools to shift their mindset in order to accommodate the substantial changes they face currently and will face in the future.

 

My intention is to open a debate around the following position:Schools need to recognise the urgency to transform as institutions to accommodate and celebrate difference and diversity, to acknowledge the inequalities of the past and work actively to remediate these through transformational leadership.

Phillips Academy Andover and Brace Center for Gender Studies

Flavia Vidal, Ph.D.

 

Session: Yes Means Yes!: Teaching Consent and Healthy Relationships

From #Me Too to the Kavanaugh hearings, our news cycle is inundated with narratives of sexual assault. The college statistics about gender-based violence are eye opening. In this workshop, we will examine how these issues play out in our school communities and discuss strategies and tools that have proven effective in teaching students how to form healthy relationships, to give and obtain consent, and to develop positive sexual identities.

:Director of the Brace Center for Gender Studies and Instructor in English and Interdisciplinary Studies

:Phillips Academy Andover (USA)

University of Notre Dame

Mary de Villiers

 

Session: Sharing Their Stories: Discussing Difficult Situations in an Application

In preparing their university applications, students may be unsure of how and when to share information about challenging situations they have faced. In this session, we aim to explore the ways in which students can be their best self-advocates, in relaying difficult and complex situations to the Admissions Committee, through different application methods (Common Application, university-specific, and UCAS). The expert panel will highlight ways in which college counselors and school officials can best support their students through a USA and UK lens.

 

We will provide an overview on the regulations and protections through the lens of US and UK systems, as well as the support services offered on our campus communities. The conversation will be a comprehensive and focused on supporting students through the application process, as well as providing tools to influencers and stakeholders on how to help students identify the right fit community for their needs.

:Director of International Admissions

:University of Notre Dame (USA)

The Brentwood School

Jean Rutherford Wall

 

Session: How to approach the college admissions process in a developmental way– meeting students where they are

Each student comes to school as an individual with different needs and at different stages of growth. High school educators see tremendous growth and try to plan programming that is appropriate for a wide range of students, and it is through the relationships our students form with educators in our communities that they grow and develop into their best person. In this session we hope to provide information that will be helpful to everyone on making this process less stressful and more of a journey of discovery- to help young people learn about who they are and what they need in their next educational chapter. This session will focus on programs, policies and philosophies that promote a healthy college admission process culture. The high school counselors will share programs that work well in their school environment and our college admissions officer will share his perspective on the evidence he sees in applications of the impact of high school educators.

 


 

Session: How to best utilize your school community to serve the needs of all of your students in their journey to college

It takes a village to get a young person to college and independent schools have a unique opportunity to leverage the strengths and talents of the adults in the community to support student growth. This session will focus on how various schools utilize the strengths and talents of their community to develop and support a healthy college search process for students. Our panelists will share information about specific programs or procedures that help students feel comfortable focusing on fit for them, not where the school falls in the rankings. They will provide information about how they educate faculty about the college admissions process and will discuss programs that involve teachers or other community members (for example, programs about arts in admission or collegiate athletics). It is our hope that the pragmatic, programmatic information presented will provide those in attendance with information that they can adapt for use in their schools.

:Director of College Counseling

:The Brentwood School (UK)

Boston University

Kelly Walter

 

Session: The Ethics of Counseling and Admissions: Case Studies

Ethical college counseling and admission is the cornerstone of our profession.  In fact, the Code of Ethics and Professional Practices ensures that high professional standards are used in the recruitment of students and the transition into and within postsecondary education.  This interactive session will consider a series of ethical case studies and discuss outcomes and best practices from the perspective of secondary school leaders and admissions leaders and evaluate impacts.

:Associate Vice President for Enrollment & Dean of Admissions

:Boston University (USA)

Amherst College

Xiaofeng Wan

 

Session: The Ethics of Counseling and Admissions: Case Studies

Ethical college counseling and admission is the cornerstone of our profession.  In fact, the Code of Ethics and Professional Practices ensures that high professional standards are used in the recruitment of students and the transition into and within postsecondary education.  This interactive session will consider a series of ethical case studies and discuss outcomes and best practices from the perspective of secondary school leaders and admissions leaders and evaluate impacts.

:Associate Dean of Admission, Coordinator of International Recruitment

:Amherst College (USA)

Northwestern University

Christopher Watson

 

Session: The Stress of College Admissions: A Discussion between Schools and Deans

The admissions process to selective colleges is complex, filled with uncertainty, and extraordinarily stressful for high school students to navigate. As a result of the ups and downs of this process and the inherent competition, students often experience a loss of self-confidence and self-esteem.  This session will be an honest and open discussion between school leaders, college counselors, and deans about how students can be best supported during this process, and what can be done to make the admissions process more inclusive of soft skills, such as vulnerability, risk-taking and embracing failure.

:Associate Vice President and Dean of Undergraduate Enrollment

:Northwestern University (USA)

Tsinghua University

Yuan Wei

 

Session: Closing the Emotional Preparation Gap

Social and emotional abilities are said to be indicators of how well a person adjusts to their environment, change and, ultimately, how they experience achievement over the course of their life. Core development abilities such as mindfulness, emotional stability, openness and affability, can be as or even more important than cognitive intelligence in determining future employment. Despite these competencies being related to meaningful life outcomes, it can be challenging for educators to find effective ways to prioritize, teach and assess social and emotional skills.

 

Combining social and emotional skills with academic development creates high-quality learning experiences that empower students to be more effective contributors in their classrooms today and in their workplaces and communities tomorrow. This panel made up of educators, university deans and business leaders will share their personal experiences on the social and emotional abilities needed to transition from school to the workforce.

:Tsinghua University (China)

Association for the Education & Guardianship of International Students

Yasemin Wigglesworth

 

Supporting International Students

International students are considered to be a vulnerable group by safeguarding experts.  Whilst we seek to encourage international students to come and study in our countries, we must ensure that they are well looked after, that their welfare is protected, and that their experience of life and study in their new country is therefore extremely positive.

 

This session will explore how to best support international students, drawing on the experience and expertise of the panelists, and will cover: pre-departure support; the role of the agent and educational guardian; managing expectations of both student and parents/family; culture shock; safeguarding; integration; mental wellbeing; undiagnosed conditions such as autism; cultural stigma; undisclosed medical conditions; and successful learning.

 

:Executive Officer

:Association for the Education & Guardianship of International Students (UK)

Deputy Dean and Director of Admissions

Peter Wilson

 

Session: Supporting Students through Times of Change

This panel will examine the ways secondary schools and universities can support students in transition.  Whether it be the period between lower school to upper school, upper school to higher education, or higher education to the workforce, institutions are charged with helping students become well-adjusted citizens and school personnel have an important role in assisting students’ adaptation to change.  Panelists will share insights, programs and perspectives that aid in student transitions on their campus and beyond.

:Deputy Dean and Director of Admissions

:The University of Chicago (USA)

Nova School of Business and Economics

Victoria Winter

 

Session: Supporting International Students

Victoria Winter is the Director of Institutional Relations and International Development at Nova School of Business and Economics. She is responsible for new market development and ensuring that the School can provide a welcoming environment for incoming students from diverse cultures, and that Nova SBE students are well taken care of when participating in exchanges to other institutions. Having a professional career in International Development and General Management that has taken her to live and work in 4 continents, she understands well both the opportunities and the challenges faced by foreigners when they are immersed in a culture so different from their own and are so far from home.
Victoria is an Australian born, New Zealand raised, daughter of British parents. She has also worked in South Korea and Brazil. Victoria has called Portugal home for the past 3 years, where she lives with her Portuguese husband and their twin sons.

 

:Director of Institutional Relations and International Development

:Nova School of Business and Economics

High School Affiliated to Fudan University

Jian Wu

 

Session: Bridging Cultures

How should educators help bridge the gap to a new vision of globalism? Globalization has faltered, some would say, failed, with growing inequalities, divisions and challenges.  How can schools and universities, rooted in their local communities and working across educational sectors,  better cultivate an appreciation of the connections that bind communities around the world?

:Principal and Party Secretary

:High School Affiliated to Fudan University (China)

Principal, Beijing 101 Middle School

Yunquan Wu

He has been teaching and managing in secondary schools such as Jiangsu and Beijing in China. He served as the director of the Haidian District Education Committee in Beijing.  In 2018, he served as the principal of Beijing 101 Middle School, and concurrently served as member of the Standing Committee of the Haidian District Political Consultative Conference, deputy director of the science-education-culture-health Committee of the Haidian District Political Consultative Conference, and director of the China Soong Ching Ling Foundation.

 

Principal Lu has rich experience in middle school education management and mathematics teaching. He has published many papers in China’s core journals, participated in the preparation of new Chinese high school mathematics textbooks, and presided over many provincial and municipal research projects. He was awarded the honorary title of Beijing Excellent Teacher and National Model Teacher.

Global Thought Leadership

Dr. Helen Wright

 

Session: Releasing the potential of your faculty; Why? What? How?

This session will explore some of the innovative and forward-looking practices currently employed by schools across the world to empower and develop their faculty staff.

Starting from the premise that teachers and middle leaders are the engine and powerhouse of a school, the panelists will discuss their own experiences of successful programs and initiatives that have supported and driven forward the development of school faculty, and they will share perspectives and insights that will hopefully inspire other colleagues to lead change in their own schools.

:International Education Advisor

:Global Thought Leadership (Scotland)

Tsinghua University

Liao Ying

Session: Bridging Cultures

 

Liao Ying is the director of the Center for Global Competence Development of Tsinghua University. The Center provides campus-wide transformative learning experiences with a global focus, leads cutting-edge research and development in the fields of global education, facilitates cross-cultural engagement opportunities for all students and faculty members, and promotes a global competency based cross-cultural understanding on campus and beyond. Liao Ying is experienced in student affairs and international education. She has a bachelor degree in Biomedical Engineering and a master degree inLaw from Tsinghua University. She gained her second master degree in Computer Science at OregonGraduate Institute of Science and Technology, USA.

The Brearley School

Maria-Anna Zimmermann

 

Session: The Creation and Implementation of a K-XII Student Life Program to Complement a Rigorous Academic Program

Schools like ours are well regarded for their academic excellence. We attract bright students who go onto world class colleges and universities, and contribute to society in meaningful ways. However, a student – a child, is far more than the sum of their academic  efforts.  With anxiety and depression reaching unprecedented levels evident at the higher education level and ever-creeping into younger grades, it is imperative that schools support the learning of their students beyond the three R’s. We must care for them socially, emotionally, and in terms of their mental and physical health.

 

Brearley has developed a three-strand program in the areas of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion; Social-Emotional Learning; and Sexuality and Health Education for all students in our K-XII girls’ school. Hear from our Head of School and Assistant Head of School for Student Life talk about Brearley’s K-XII Student Life program and the structures in place which support it. Speakers will focus, in particular, on the opportunities and challenges of implementing the K-XII  sexuality  health  education program.

:Assistant Head of School for Student Life; Head of the Lower School

:The Brearley School (USA)

Speakers will be added leading up to the 2019 Conference in July. Please visit our website for updates.

Schedule

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